Join Our Mailing List
Email:

Bookmark and Share


  Home > News > Additional Stories

Queer Youth Challenge Society's Attempt to Define Them in Revealing Photography Project

By Marcie Bianco
Mic.com
September 29th, 2014
queer, youth, challenge, society's, attempt, to, define, them, in, revealing, photography, project,

A new photography project is giving voices to queer youth, one snapshot at a time.

Rachelle Lee Smith's Speaking OUT: Queer Youth in Focus, recently published as a book, highlights the individuality and diversity of a community that has long felt devalued, underestimated and silenced. Queer youth in particular are in need of support and opportunities: According to the Williams Institute, LGBT youth comprise an estimated 40% of the homeless youth population.

In Speaking OUT, Smith brings together myriad queer youth, ages 14 to 24, and presents their portraits "without judgment or stereotype, by eliminating environmental influence with [the use of] a stark white backdrop," she writes on her recently funded Indiegogo. [T]his backdrop acts as a blank canvas, where each subject's personal thoughts are handwritten onto the final photographic print. [...E]ach individual is given the spotlight and a chance to have a voice, but also the strength of the group as a whole."

In an interview with Mic, Smith revealed that she was inspired to create Speaking OUT because of her own relative ease coming out. "I had a remarkably positive experience, and my friends and family were accepting and supportive," she said. "I knew that was rare and I was very lucky, but I did not realize the depth of my fortune until I went to college and met people that had dramatically difference experiences from me and that shared some horrific stories."

In particular, Smith recalls the story of a friend being "chased down the street by frat guys yelling slurs and throwing beer bottles at her." Identifying the story as "a defining moment," Smith told Mic she knew she "needed to do something with the only tool I had — my camera."  

Smith began by photographing friends, but word spread. Soon it was "friends of friends, then word of mouth, and then I reached out to local schools, youth centers and community centers," primarily in and around Philadelphia. 
"I did not 'seek diversity,'" Smith said. "It just happened, and I did not turn anyone away who wanted to be in the project. Unfortunately, I have dozens of unfinished prints from people that are not in the book."
Growing up an "extremely shy kid," Smith found comfort and solace in photography. "My camera was my mask that I could hide behind and do good in the world," she said. "It allowed me the confidence to get up close and personal and ask a lot of questions in any situation."
The use of a white backdrop, allowing the subjects complete purview over their representation, was critical for Smith. "It was important to me to let the subjects speak," she said. "Instead of letting the photo tell the entire story, I capture the person, but then let them fill in their experiences with their handwritten text directly on top of the photograph." 
So far, the project has recieved a resounding amount of support. Besides raising its full $15,000 target on Indiegogo, the series has been shown at the HRC headquarters in Washington, D.C., and featured at World Pride in Toronto. "I feel so fortunate to be able to get these stories out there and have this book as not only a nice coffee table book, but more so an easily digestible and fun educational guide to growing up queer," Smith said.

A lot has changed for LGBT advocacy and awareness in America, with the past 10 a watershed decade for the movement. Smith said she has met a number of gay rights activists, including Barbara Gittings and Frank Kameny, who recounted their stories of growing up gay. Now, she explains, people "wear LGBTQ-related T-shirts that they can buy at the mall. It's an incredible shift, but one that I hope the younger generations do not take for granted, because our struggles have been long and hard, but they are paying off!"
"I have seen the themes of what people in this project have written move from themes of fear, shame and anxiety to themes of pride, ownership and unabashed joy," she said. "And I think it will only continue in that direction."
Image Credit (all): Rachelle Lee Smith

Dr. Marcie Bianco is a columnist and contributing writer at AfterEllen and Lambda Literary, as well as an adjunct associate professor at John Jay College at Hunter College. She has also contributed to Curve Magazine, Feministing, The Feminist Wire, ...

Buy Speaking OUT | Buy Speaking OUT e-Book | Back to Rachelle Lee Smith's Author Page




David Hartsough's Waging Peace Fall Book Tour Dates

FALL 2014 BOOK TOUR PUBLIC EVENTS

Buy Waging Peace | Buy Waging Peace e-Book | David Hartsough's Author Page

Any questions or comments can be directed to Jan Hartsough at: janhartso@gmail.com


Washington, DC

November 18 Tuesday
11am-12:30pm Montgomery Community College, Science Center 152 in Rockville, MD.

7-8:30pm University of Maryland in College Park, MD. Beyond the Classroom program, 1102 South Campus Commons, Bldg One.

November 19 Wednesday
7pm Florida Avenue Friends Meeting, 2111 Florida Avenue NW, Washington DC

November 20 Thursday
5-6:45pm American University - Creative Peace Initiative in Ward Circl Building Room 1 - 4400 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, DC

Philadelphia Area

November 24 Monday

10am talk at Foulkeways, in the Jenkins Parlor at 1120 Meetinghouse Road in Gwynedd, PA.

7pm Medford Leas talk in Theatre, 661 Medford Leas, Medford, NJ

November 25 Tuesday
12:30-1:30pm talk at Friends Center, 15th and Cherry St in Philadelphia, PA

November 26 Wednesday
1:30pm  Crosslands talk, William Penn Room at 16 Kendal Drive in Kennett Square, PA

4 pm Kendal talk in Activity Central, 16 Kendal Drive, Kennett Square, PA

November 30 Sunday
12:45 pm Central Philadelpia Quaker Meeting, 15th & Cherry St in Philadelphia, PA

December 1 Monday
7 pm Talk at Pendle Hill,
in the Barn at 338 Plush Mill Road, Wallingford, PA

December 2 Tuesday
2pm assembly at the theatre of Westtown School in Westtown, PA

December 3 Wednesday
4:30-6pm Public book talk at Haverford College in Chase Auditorium for students and others (followed by dinner at 7pm with Kay Edwards and Walter Hjelt-Sullivan)

December 4 Thursday
5pm book talk at Swarthmore College, Bond Hall at 500 College Ave

December 7 Sunday
1:30pm Germantown Monthly Meeting in Phila at 47 West Coulter Street in Philadelphia, Social Room.

New York City

December 8 Monday

7-8:30pm at Manhattan Quaker Meetinghouse at 15 Rutherford Place (15th Street). Topic: Peacebuilding and Nonviolent Movements

December 9 Tuesday

8-9:30pm talk at Manhattan Catholic Worker’s Mary House, 55 Third Street.   Topic: "The Long Road to Justice from Montgomery to Ferguson”

California

December 16 Tuesday
Santa Rosa  7:15pm  Friends House, 684 Benicia Drive in Santa Rosa, CA

December 18 Thursday
Sacramento 7pm-9pm: The Marxist school of Sacramento – Sierra 2 Center, 2791 – 24th Street, Classroom 9 (between Castro Way and 4th Avenue)

Any questions or comments can be directed to Jan Hartsough at: janhartso@gmail.com

Buy Waging Peace | Buy Waging Peace e-Book | Back to David Hartsough's Author Page

 

Previous Waging Peace Tour Dates:

OCTOBER 1-14th: NEW ENGLAND STATES


Oct. 2 Thursday
7pm Cambridge Friends Meeting, 5 Longfellow Park, Cambridge, MA   Contact Skip Schiel     
 
October 3 Friday  
7:00pm WAGING PEACE book talk and discussion at First Universalist Church, 59 Main Street in Essex, MA.  Co-sponsored by North Shore Coalition for Peace and Justice, Merrimack Valley People for Peace, Amesbury Peace Center, Samantha Smith Chapter Veterans for Peace. 

October 5 Sunday            
11am   New England Peace Pagoda,100 Cave Hill Road, Leverett ,MA (just N. of Amherst)     25th Anniversary celebration with David offering keynote address.  Ceremony, Interfaith Prayers, Lunch, Cultural Program.

October 6  Monday   
Noon-1pm  Hampshire College in Amherst, MA  talk sponsored by Office on Sustainability and Spiritual Life Hampshire

4-5:30pm  World Eye Bookstore, 156 Main St. in Greenfield,MA sponsored by Traprock Peace Center. 

7:30pm  Putney Friend’s Meeting talk and discussion in Putney, VT 
 
October 7 Tuesday
7pm  Broadside Bookshop, 247 Main Street in Northampton, MA

October 9 Thursday 
7pm  Burlington Friends Meeting, 173 North Prospect, Burlington, VT 

October 12 Sunday 
10:30am  Acadia Friends Meeting, Neighborhood House on Main Street in Northeast Harbor, Maine

4pm  College of the Atlantic student gathering at COA McCormick Lecture Hall in Bar Harbor, Maine

OCTOBER 14-27: PACIFIC NORTHWEST


October 15 Wednesday

7:30pm  Annual Peace Lecture in Salem, OR at Hudson Recital Hall, Mary Stuart Rogers Music Center, Willamette University, 900 State Street 

October 16 Thursday
7pm  Eugene Friends Meetinghouse, 2274 Onyx Street, Eugene, OR

October 18 Saturday
2-4pm  Discussion at Salem Friends Meetinghouse, 490 19th Street in Salem, OR

7:30pm Multnomah Friends Meeting, 4312 South East Stark, Portland, OR  

October 20 Monday

6 pm Portland State Univ. Students United for Nonviolence (SUN) discussion in Rm. 333, Smith Memorial Student Union Building in Portland, OR

October 21 Tuesday
7:30am – 8:30 AM  Portland Pearl Rotary Club at 721 NW 9th Ave in Portland, OR

7:30 pm Olympia Friends Meetinghouse, 3201 Boston Harbor Road N.E. in Olympia, WA

October 22 Wednesday

7pm University Temple United Methodist Church, 1415 N.E. 43rd St, Seattle, WA  sponsored by University Bookstore

October 23 Thursday
7pm Port Townsend talk at Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2333 San Juan Avenue, PT, co-sponsored with local Quakers in Port Townsend, WA

October 24 Friday
1pm radio phone interview in Port Townsend, WA

7pm Whidbey Island gathering with Tom Ewell

October 26 Sunday
12:20pm Book signing at University Friends Meeting at 4001 9th Ave NE,  Seattle, WA

November 2 Sunday   
San Francisco 1pm   SF Friends Meetinghouse, 65 9th Street in San Francisco, CA

November 5 Wednesday
Chico  7pm  Chico State University & Chico Peace Center

November 9 Sunday
Berkeley  7pm  Berkeley Unitarian Fellowship at Cedar and Bonita in Berkeley, CA

 

 




Little Rock & Fayetteville Collective Liberation Together

By Arkansas ElderX
Fayetteville Free Zone
9/1/2014

In Lak' ech

In Lak’ech:
Tú eres mi otro yo.
You are my other me.
Si te hago daño a ti,
If I do harm to you,
Me hago daño a mi mismo.
I do harm to myself.
Si te amo y respeto,
If I love and respect you,
Me amo y respeto yo.
I love and respect myself.
- Luis Valdez, “Pensamiento Serpentino”

The Background:

Let’s blame it all on Chris Crass. He’s a good starting place, though the roots of all this go much further back. Back for centuries actually. Still, Crass makes a reasonable starting place for this particular discussion. You see, the man wrote a book, Towards Collective Liberation: Anti-Racist Organizing, Feminist Praxis, and Movement Building Strategy.

“A white guy writing about racism? Why would I want to read that?” Some people may not understand her reaction, but those who have experienced mansplaining and/or white-’splaining understand her instinctive response all too well.

Then she heard that it was a book about racism written by a white guy for other white folks. Interesting. Then Meredith Martin Moats heard that several of  her activist friends of color thought highly of the book. So, she figured, it was perhaps time to give it a read. Right there, that’s the start of this part of the story.

She read the book. No, she devoured the book. She got so excited that she called some of her friends together and they collectively devoured the book. They all got so excited that they worked out how to bring the author to Arkansas to speak in both Little Rock, their home town, and in Fayetteville.

The Little Rock Collective Liberation group was so excited about the book though, that they couldn’t wait until Chris Crass got here. So they came up to Fayetteville on Sunday to talk with local activists here about our collective liberation.

Collective Liberation 01 Mdm

The Book:

So just what is all this excitement about? For one thing, in his introduction to the book, Chris Dixon, a long time anarchist organizer, firmly grounds the book and us in a long, long tradition of resistance and grassroots activism. From the last few decades to the last couple of centuries, Dixon gives us back our herstory and history that mainstream culture has tried to suppress. He places the book and us firmly in the centuries long struggle for transformation. He gives us back our ancestors and our traditions.

For another thing, the book is grounded in practical, grassroots organizing across the lines of gender, race, class, age, and ability. It sidesteps the academic and ideological language that too often chokes the life out of such work for those who don’t share the jargon.

The real power of the book though, is in its vision of a transformative movement that includes us all. And in the practical realities of building such a  movement. Diversity and inclusion are easy words to say but they are much harder to do when we are all tripping over our own cultural baggage as well as the wounds which have been inflicted on each of us. Crass talks about how we can actually build a transformative movement across those old lines of division.

The People:

This is not just a book review though. Something much more significant than that happened at the OMNI Center yesterday afternoon, when the Little Rock and Fayetteville activists sat down to talk with each other.

We talked about what collective liberation means to each of us and why we thought it was important enough to spend a Sunday afternoon discussing it. We talked about the activist work going on in Little Rock and about what was happening here locally. We talked about ways that we can network and stay engaged with each other, supporting each other’s work on an ongoing basis.

The Arkansas Food Network, the Cisneros Project, oral histories and the McElroy House, Boiled Down Juice, LEAFF, men against patriarchy, solidarity economies and worker owned co-ops, the work of the OMNI Center and even that of the Fayetteville Free Zone, all were discussed. There is a lot going on in both towns and there are a lot of ways we can support each other.

Collective Liberation 02 Mdm

Building An Ongoing Network:

Two concrete ways for the activists in Little Rock and in Fayetteville to continue engaging with each other were suggested. The first was for offline, face to face contact. People in both cities are very interested in the Arkansas Truthful Tuesday Coalition.  Fayetteville folks are talking about going down to Little Rock at least once a month for Truthful Tuesday. When they do, they will meet with the Little Rock Collective Liberation group for coffee to continue talking with each other.

The second suggestion for ongoing engagement was online- to use social media to keep everyone abreast of what was going on in their respective cities. Both the Boiled Down Juice and the Fayetteville Free Zone can be used as platforms for sharing information, as can the Facebook pages and Twitter accounts for the assorted groups. Here’s the links for those who want to plug into the various networks and information flows.

To quote an  old, old story about love and resistance in the face of oncoming evil, Sunday afternoon’s meeting between Little Rock and Fayetteville activists was the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

Our feature photo is by ADKphoto, used with permission, all rights reserved. The other two photos are by the FFZ collective.

Author, educator and organizer Chris Crass is often at the forefront of multiracial and feminist movements. Crass sat down with the Review this week to talk about his experience as an activist and his thoughts on antiracist organizing.

 The topic of your talk, “Anti-Racist Organizing in White Communities,” is something that our college has been struggling with, both as an institution and as a student body. Could you begin by talking about the difference between racist and anti-racist organizing?

It’s a really common experience for white people who are socially conscious and who are coming to awareness about issues of race, particularly with the campus having the Day of Solidarity. There’s going to be a lot of folks — white folks in particular — being like, ‘Oh my God, I haven’t thought about this before,’ or, ‘I didn’t think it was this bad,’ or, ‘I thought this was something that was in the past,’ or ‘I don’t want to be part of the problem,’ and then one of the first next steps [ for those groups] is often the question of how to diversify. I’ve had a lot of experience being a part of mostly or all-white social justice progressive efforts where [that drive to diversify often comes first]. But the question that’s often more helpful is, ‘How can we be a part of challenging racism? How can we be a part of ending institutional white supremacy? What are positive steps, as a white environmental group, we could take to support environmental justice efforts by students of color?’ One of the ways that white supremacy really impacts white people is to invisible-ize the work that’s happening in communities of color, the leadership that’s happening in communities of color, the voices, the perspectives — sometimes you’ll have white activists come to consciousness about race and be like, ‘Oh my gosh, we have to get people of color to join our group,’ and then there’ll be activists of color who will be like, ‘Well, we’ve been working on these issues for a really long time, so rather than coming to us and asking us to diversify your group, it’s more of how could you, as a mostly white group, support the work that students of color are already involved in and build partnership and trust.’

 

What are some positive steps that Oberlin can take toward anti-racist organizing?

Some key ones are learning about work that’s already happen[ed] historically in communities of color, learning about issues. So if you’re in a social justice or progressive student group that’s mostly white, what are issues that students of color are working on, and what are some ways that your group can help support that work? A way that racism often operates is [by determining] whose voices are prioritized. Who’s been told all of their life, ‘You have an important story to tell. You should tell the world about what you think.’ And then there’s a lot of folks — women, queer folks, trans* folks, working class, folks of color — who are regularly told, ‘You have nothing useful to contribute. These aren’t spaces that you even belong in, let alone that you should be working in.’ [It’s about] working to recognize those kind of barriers and having open conversations with activists, leaders of color on campus about the struggles that [you’re] facing and how to think about it together. It’s not going to folks of color and [asking them] to solve all the problems but having genuine conversations about how to overcome these obstacles.

 

How would you explain the reality of institutional racism to someone who might not be familiar with its historical and cultural background?

No one was born with it all figured out. First of all, the way that racism operates is that it socializes and rewards white people to be completely ignorant of racism. The fact that there are so many white people who feel attacked, or who think that it’s racist to even talk about racism, is evidence of how powerful racism operates. Because in communities of color, historically and today, the impacts of racism are so stark. Often white people today look back at white people in the past — whether it’s the white people who were participating, supporting, oblivious [to] or on the sidelines of slavery, or white people who were supportive or on the sidelines of Jim Crow and apartheid in the sixties — and say, ‘How could they have just done nothing?’ [They think] it’s so obvious. People 30 years from now will look back on us today and say, ‘How could white people have not been aware of the mass incarceration, of the mass poverty, of the incredible disparities and not done something?’ As students, [we need to] recognize that we are historical actors, and just as we look on the past and think it was so clear, people will look back on our day and think that it’s so clear. Because in the past, people often said that it was too confusing, that there was  no issue, that it was cultural. [We have to] recognize that we need to make a choice [about] what side of history we want to stand on. It can be a hard journey, but it’s one that ultimately connects us back to our deepest humanity. [We need to get] away from fear, away from ignorance, away from hate and toward a deeper love for ourselves and the people in our community. [People say,] ‘Well, the reason there’s so many black and brown people in prison is because of these reasons,’ and there’s all this justification in the way that the media portrays it, and throughout history that’s always been true. It wasn’t just this super clear cut obvious right and obvious wrong. So we need to take responsibility to investigate and learn and also to open ourselves up to really learning.

 

I’m sure, as a white male talking about feminism and racism, you have been told that you have no right to speak about these issues. Can you talk about your thoughts on who can legitimately contribute to these conversations?

We’re organizing students of color around ethnic studies, around anti-prison issues, around the over-policing of our communities and the underresourcing of our communities, but there’s so much resistance from so many white people who either refuse to believe that this is a reality or accept that it’s wrong but that there’s nothing that they can do about it. We need white people to organize other white people who can relate their own experience about coming to consciousness around these issues, to try to move and support more and more white people to join in multiracial efforts and take on injustice. For me, it’s always [about] trying to remember that it’s absolutely important to amplify and support the voices and leadership of folks of color. This is not about trying to get a bunch of white people to fix the problem for everybody else. Racism is really a cancer in white communities, killing white communities. [It] raises people to racially profile others, to hate or be completely ignorant of other people’s lives and experiences. For me, it’s less about taking [people of colors’] stories and bringing them to white people, and more about connecting with other people as a white person around: How can we come to consciousness about racism, how can we overcome some of the barriers that hold us back from becoming involved, and how can we make really powerful contributions to working toward social justice and structural equality?

- See more at: http://oberlinreview.org/5225/uncategorized/off-the-cuff-chris-crass-author-activist-and-anti-racist-organizer/#sthash.5w2pEyva.dpuf

Author, educator and organizer Chris Crass is often at the forefront of multiracial and feminist movements. Crass sat down with the Review this week to talk about his experience as an activist and his thoughts on antiracist organizing.

 The topic of your talk, “Anti-Racist Organizing in White Communities,” is something that our college has been struggling with, both as an institution and as a student body. Could you begin by talking about the difference between racist and anti-racist organizing?

It’s a really common experience for white people who are socially conscious and who are coming to awareness about issues of race, particularly with the campus having the Day of Solidarity. There’s going to be a lot of folks — white folks in particular — being like, ‘Oh my God, I haven’t thought about this before,’ or, ‘I didn’t think it was this bad,’ or, ‘I thought this was something that was in the past,’ or ‘I don’t want to be part of the problem,’ and then one of the first next steps [ for those groups] is often the question of how to diversify. I’ve had a lot of experience being a part of mostly or all-white social justice progressive efforts where [that drive to diversify often comes first]. But the question that’s often more helpful is, ‘How can we be a part of challenging racism? How can we be a part of ending institutional white supremacy? What are positive steps, as a white environmental group, we could take to support environmental justice efforts by students of color?’ One of the ways that white supremacy really impacts white people is to invisible-ize the work that’s happening in communities of color, the leadership that’s happening in communities of color, the voices, the perspectives — sometimes you’ll have white activists come to consciousness about race and be like, ‘Oh my gosh, we have to get people of color to join our group,’ and then there’ll be activists of color who will be like, ‘Well, we’ve been working on these issues for a really long time, so rather than coming to us and asking us to diversify your group, it’s more of how could you, as a mostly white group, support the work that students of color are already involved in and build partnership and trust.’

 

What are some positive steps that Oberlin can take toward anti-racist organizing?

Some key ones are learning about work that’s already happen[ed] historically in communities of color, learning about issues. So if you’re in a social justice or progressive student group that’s mostly white, what are issues that students of color are working on, and what are some ways that your group can help support that work? A way that racism often operates is [by determining] whose voices are prioritized. Who’s been told all of their life, ‘You have an important story to tell. You should tell the world about what you think.’ And then there’s a lot of folks — women, queer folks, trans* folks, working class, folks of color — who are regularly told, ‘You have nothing useful to contribute. These aren’t spaces that you even belong in, let alone that you should be working in.’ [It’s about] working to recognize those kind of barriers and having open conversations with activists, leaders of color on campus about the struggles that [you’re] facing and how to think about it together. It’s not going to folks of color and [asking them] to solve all the problems but having genuine conversations about how to overcome these obstacles.

 

How would you explain the reality of institutional racism to someone who might not be familiar with its historical and cultural background?

No one was born with it all figured out. First of all, the way that racism operates is that it socializes and rewards white people to be completely ignorant of racism. The fact that there are so many white people who feel attacked, or who think that it’s racist to even talk about racism, is evidence of how powerful racism operates. Because in communities of color, historically and today, the impacts of racism are so stark. Often white people today look back at white people in the past — whether it’s the white people who were participating, supporting, oblivious [to] or on the sidelines of slavery, or white people who were supportive or on the sidelines of Jim Crow and apartheid in the sixties — and say, ‘How could they have just done nothing?’ [They think] it’s so obvious. People 30 years from now will look back on us today and say, ‘How could white people have not been aware of the mass incarceration, of the mass poverty, of the incredible disparities and not done something?’ As students, [we need to] recognize that we are historical actors, and just as we look on the past and think it was so clear, people will look back on our day and think that it’s so clear. Because in the past, people often said that it was too confusing, that there was  no issue, that it was cultural. [We have to] recognize that we need to make a choice [about] what side of history we want to stand on. It can be a hard journey, but it’s one that ultimately connects us back to our deepest humanity. [We need to get] away from fear, away from ignorance, away from hate and toward a deeper love for ourselves and the people in our community. [People say,] ‘Well, the reason there’s so many black and brown people in prison is because of these reasons,’ and there’s all this justification in the way that the media portrays it, and throughout history that’s always been true. It wasn’t just this super clear cut obvious right and obvious wrong. So we need to take responsibility to investigate and learn and also to open ourselves up to really learning.

 

I’m sure, as a white male talking about feminism and racism, you have been told that you have no right to speak about these issues. Can you talk about your thoughts on who can legitimately contribute to these conversations?

We’re organizing students of color around ethnic studies, around anti-prison issues, around the over-policing of our communities and the underresourcing of our communities, but there’s so much resistance from so many white people who either refuse to believe that this is a reality or accept that it’s wrong but that there’s nothing that they can do about it. We need white people to organize other white people who can relate their own experience about coming to consciousness around these issues, to try to move and support more and more white people to join in multiracial efforts and take on injustice. For me, it’s always [about] trying to remember that it’s absolutely important to amplify and support the voices and leadership of folks of color. This is not about trying to get a bunch of white people to fix the problem for everybody else. Racism is really a cancer in white communities, killing white communities. [It] raises people to racially profile others, to hate or be completely ignorant of other people’s lives and experiences. For me, it’s less about taking [people of colors’] stories and bringing them to white people, and more about connecting with other people as a white person around: How can we come to consciousness about racism, how can we overcome some of the barriers that hold us back from becoming involved, and how can we make really powerful contributions to working toward social justice and structural equality?

- See more at: http://oberlinreview.org/5225/uncategorized/off-the-cuff-chris-crass-author-activist-and-anti-racist-organizer/#sthash.5w2pEyva.dpuf

Buy book now | Buy e-Book now | Back to Chris Crass's Author Page




Karen Joy Fowler's The Science of Herself: An Ambling Along the Aqueduct Review

By Timmi Duchamp
Ambling Along the Aqueduct
August 24th, 2014

Have you read Karen Joy Fowler's The Science of Herself, a new volume in PM Press's Outspoken Authors series? The publication date is 2013, but I only recently read it. This series, if you don't know of it, includes, among other slim volumes the size of Conversation Pieces, Nalo Hopkinson's Report from Planet Midnight and Ursula K. Le Guin's The Wild Girls. The Science of Herself contains a brand new story, "The Science of Herself," two reprinted stories (the searing "The Pelican Bar" and "The Further Adventures of the Invisible Man"), "More Exuberant Than Is Strictly Tasteful," a characteristically snappy interview conducted by Terry Bisson, and "The Motherhood Statement," an essay combining fire and irony.

By the time I finished reading the second page of "The Science of Herself," which opens the volume, I'd fallen hard for it. The seaside village of Lyme Regis in the first decades of the nineteenth century? How could any voracious reader not think first of Anne Elliot watching Captain Wentworth as he fails to catch Louisa Musgrove when she willfully throws herself off the stairs, in Jane Austen's last novel, Persuasion? Fowler takes Anne Elliot's visit to Lyme Regis as her point of departure, leading to imagining Austen herself walking that beach and not seeing (yes, yes , not seeing) a young girl who was often to be found on that beach. "Strangely deressed, lower class, odd in affect, and desperately poor, she was not really the kind of girl who wanders into an Austen novel." (2) But then Fowler quickly goes on to note that Austen's visit to Lyme Regis had actually been made to see this girl's father, Richard Anning, a cabinetmaker. The connection between the unnoticed young girl and Jane Austen, though virtually invisible to the casual eye, is actual.

Anning, besides being a cabinetmaker, was also a fossil hunter; more interestingly, his daughter Mary proved to be not only a more redoubtable fossil hunter than he, the person who recovered the first complete ichthysaurus ever to be found, but also a sharp paleontologist whose contributions to the field were only belatedly awarded public acknowledgment when the British Royal Society named her on their list of the ten British women who have most influenced the history of science. "The Science of Herself" tells a story about Mary Anning's life that "wouldn't have made sense [in Austen's novel] with her bits of gothic history, her lightning, her science, her creatures. She wouldn't make sense in any story until the story changed." (25)

 I've long been interested in the problem-- one that Fowler has been mining for some time-- of stories that don't fit "the story" that is the template for how stories are told. It's a problem faced by writers wishing to write stories that don't fit the limits or language or assumptions of the current conventions, and a problem for readers longing for such stories and virtually unable to find them anywhere (and so often resort to ingenious methods for reading what is there slant). That template is, fortunately, always shifting. "The Science of Herself" is as much an exploration of how the stories that could be told about Mary during her lifetime were constrained and limited--how her life overflowed those constraints. The form Fowler uses to tell the story is what? It's prose, certainly. But is it fiction or nonfiction?

I'm particularly interested in the question of the form Fowler uses to tell Mary Anning's story because I've been sporadically working on a story about Emilie, the Marquise du Chatelet, for years now, struggling against the form it seems determined to take. The only form in which I seem able to cast the story of Emilie bears no resemblance to the forms in which stories about historical women are usually told. And I've been fighting that form because it resembles the form taken by "The Science of Herself," aware as I am that many readers would reject it as not really fiction (much less science fiction). I don't want to write an essay about Emilie. I want to imagine and explore aspects of her life as a woman of science in the same way in which I imagine and explore aspects of the lives of the characters I invent. In this sense, "The Science of Herself" is not an essay. Or is it? I'm thrilled that Fowler put this story out there, defying the demands that the writer choose one or the other. I think it will embolden me to finish the story. And I will say, for myself, that I'm increasingly uncertain about whether any clear distinctions can be drawn in every case between fiction and nonfiction. Obviously, some fictions are clearly, unequivocally fictional. But as someone trained in history, I've long been aware that because history is composed of narratives, it must always partake of the uncertainties (and distortions) of representation and won't ever be certain. Though based on "facts," imagination is the glue that makes those facts meaningful. In the end, we come down to story, and what stories can be told under this or that set of circumstances.

"The Science of Herself" plus "The Pelican Bar" alone would make this a bold book for a volume so slim, but "The Motherhood Statement" pushes it into the red zone. The book's second entry, "The Motherhood Statement," takes as its point of departure "The Motherhood Statement" in the Turkey City Lexicon (which Fowler describes as "a primer for science fiction workshops." "Motherhood" in this statement, like "apple pie," exemplifies "conventional social and humanistic pieties." Fowler, as anyone familiar with her work knows, is all about challenging comfortable conventions and "pieties."In principle, she's in agreement with the statement. But.
It's the specifics that give me pause. Apple pie, okay, fine, whatever. But motherhood? Nothing, absolutely nothing, appears to me more contested in our political and social and private lives than motherhood. Any woman who has ever had children can tell you it is no picnic of affirmation. Any woman who has not had children can tell you that that, too, is a controversial place to be. Neither is much admired. (28)

Fowler reminds us of something most science fiction (particularly that written by men) has not, until very recently, taken note of: "Motherhood is a concept that changes from culture to culture and over time. Sometimes it's set in opposition to mothering--motherhood, in this schematic, is the sacred duty of women, an artificial construct which underlies the whole system of patriarchy."(28)

Of course tarring "motherhood" with the brush of conventional social pieties has been a longstanding woman-bashing tradition for fiction written by US men in the twentieth century. It was a part of a concerted (highly successful) program for ejecting fiction by women from the upper echelons of literature in the US.* Fowler doesn't go into that, though, but focuses more closely on attitudes toward women vis-a-vis childraising, before paying tribute to the explorations made by feminist sf in the 1970s and then concluding with attending to the ferocious, on-going twenty-first-century attack on women's reproductive rights and how the free exercise of such rights has become a story many people and venues approach (if at all) with timidity at best and repulsion and censorship at worst. "I can remember no other time in which the attacks on women's freedom have been so widespread, so sustained, and so successful," Fowler writes. "Or half so scary... An argument that begins by positing women valuable only as mothers will end by suggesting that, even as mothers, women are not valuable at all." (32-33)  

Fowler ends the essay by returning to "The Motherhood Statement": "The easy assumption that motherhood constitutes some easy assumption is neither accurate nor serving us well. " (34)

She has a lot of good lines in her interview, but I'll offer you one here: "I believe that the learning in workshops happens to the critiquer not the critiqued." (72) Now go read this sharp little book yourself, if you haven't already.

Buy The Science of Herself now | Buy e-Book now | Back to Karen Joy Fowler's Author Page




Reading on a prison uprising in Lucasville, Ohio

Lucasville graphicBy Stefan Christoff
Free City Radio
August 27, 2014

Lucasville: The Untold Story of a Prison Uprising is a striking account on an important and under acknowledged prison uprising in recent US history, communicated by longtime lawyer, social activist and writer Staughton Lynd.

Lucasville articulates so clearly the reality of internal colonial dynamics in the US vis-à-vis the African-American experience, as the majority white town of Lucasville, Ohio, plays host for a major prison with a majority black prisoner population, staffed by almost exclusively white prison guards.

Also this excellent book speaks in detail to a localized manifestation of the greatly expanding US prison industrial complex, a horrifying colonial-capitalist machine that so clearly has, with the active collaboration of politicians and policy makers over recent decades, swept up millions of African-Americans, youth from immigrant communities and also poor, working class white communities.

Importantly Lucasville is a real story of prisoner solidarity and resistance, a book detailing a courageous stand taken by prisoners united across race lines, acting to assert a diverse set of demands, working together against incredible odds and violence in the spring 1993.

Also Lucasville is the story of a legal system that fails so clearly at delivering justice for the Lucasville Five, tried as the leaders of the prison uprising, found guilty in courtroom context that clearly is distant from any ideals of justice. 21 years later, the Lucasville Five remain locked away on Ohio death row, still proclaiming innocence, denied access to face-to-face media interviews, despite a challenge from the American Civil Liberties Union.

A great amount of detail in the book is dedicated to illustrating the injustice of the trails surrounding the Lucasville Five, clearly articulated by author and lawyer Staughton Lynd. Numerous court records and accounts detail with precise argument the injustice delivered, the cynical and violent punitive measures asserted by the state in the Lucasville Five case, deadly verdicts that only seem to have been assured through organized manipulation of the legal system in Ohio.

Introducing this both broadly reflective and extensively researched text on the Lucasville uprising is Mumia Abu-Jamal, who writes :

Lucasville.
The name is evocative. People who hear it, who may know very little about its recent role in Ohio history, seem to recognize its penal roots.
It has become a site etched upon the American mind that means prison, like Sing Sing, Marion, or Lewisburg.
The name evokes an aura of fear, of foreboding, of something strangely sinister.
That this exists is a testament to how the state has set aside sites of invisibility; where people know, in fact, very little of substance; yet know enough to know that this is something to be feared.
Yet, Lucasville exists simply because millions of people, like you, the reader, allow it to exist. It exists in your name.
Amid the silence that greets its mention, is the silence of ignorance, an ignorance that serves the interest of the state, but not of the people.
Lucasville is written to dispel that silence, to go behind the walls erected by the state (and its complicit media), to show its true face. It reveals how and why a deadly riot occurred there, which snuffed out ten lives.
Yet, there is a reason why Lucasville is not the latter-day equivalent of Attica. The five men who are the focus of this work (who have been called the Lucasville Five) worked, against great odds, to prevent an Attica (where over thirty men perished when the state unleashed deadly violence against the hostages taken, and falsely blamed it on prisoners). They sought to minimize violence, and indeed, according to substantial evidence, saved the lives of several men, prisoner and guard alike.
Yet, as the saying goes, “no good deed goes unpunished.”
The record reflects that these five men couldn’t have been any five men, drawn from the burgeoning, overcrowded population of Lucasville. Why these five?
They didn’t snitch. Or, to be more precise: they didn’t lie.

Beyond these words I would simply encourage people to pick-up a copy of Lucasville: The Untold Story of a Prison Uprising published by PM Press, this is a must read book that articulates an important moment of resistance to the contemporary US prison industrial complex.

— Stefan Christoff, August 27, 2014 (accompanying graphics from the book)

Lucasville

Buy book now | Download e-Book now | Back to Staughton Lynd's Author page 




Fire on the Mountain on GuysLitWire

By Sam J. Miller
GuysLitWire
August 13th, 2014

Maybe you remember John Brown from your history class. An abolitionist, he believed that peaceful reform of slavery was impossible, and only a violent disruption of the slaveholding status quo would end this massive, brutal injustice. In 1859 he attempted to start a slave revolt by seizing the US arsenal at Harper's Ferry in Virginia, but the assault went wrong and he and his comrades were caught and executed for treason.

Terry Bisson's Fire on the Mountain is an alternate history that asks the question - what if the assault had succeeded? What if instead of a civil war started by slaveholders who wanted to continue exploiting human beings, America had a revolution started by people who believed that all human beings should be free? In real life, John Brown worked closely with Harriet Tubman, and many scholars believe that if she hadn't been prevented by illness from traveling south to help him plan the attack, he would have succeeded. Fire on the Mountain takes a simple change - she didn't get sick, she helped the rebels, the attack was successful and started a revolution - and extrapolates a whole complicated marvelous utopian future from that. It opens 100 years later, as the prosperous state of Nova Africa is about to put a man on Mars, and pieces together the history through letters and testimonials. 

Bisson's John Brown is no white savior, coming to rescue helpless people of color. Harriet Tubman is as important a force of liberation, and the book is full of strong compelling characters (including slaves) who make active decisions that drive the plot forward. Nor does Bisson skimp on the nuanced details of how, exactly, the Harper's Ferry raid leads to such massive historic changes. It's also remarkable for how, without seeming boring or didactic or ideological, it captures the diverse opinions of abolitionists (ranging from people who oppose slavery but refuse to DO anything about it, to people who take up arms and are willing to kill and die for the cause).

Alternate history is like candy-coated medicine. We love it, because it's fun and wacky and imaginative and
isn't bound by some of the things that can make real history range from boring (like memorizing dates) to upsetting (like the fact that history is full of oppression and suffering and massacres and exploitation).

But under the candy shell of crazy what-ifs and shiny rocketships, alternate history is history. It gives us a new and deeper perspective and insight into history as a real thing, a vibrant and compelling story, as opposed to numbers in a book. For example: Scott Westerfeld's "Leviathan" trilogy takes place in an alternate-history World War One where 19th century scientific advances filled the world up with giant robots and flying whales... and yet it brings the spirit of the actual period to life, giving young readers a sense of the issues at play in that conflict.

Fire on the Mountain is a brilliant book, deeply moving for the strength of its imagination and the warm-hearted generosity of its spirit, for the audacity of an author who dares to propose a history less horrible. I suspect it would work as well on a young man who is excited about issues of history & race & activism, as it would on a guy who doesn't care about any of that, but likes a good science fiction story. 

Buy this book now | Download e-Book now | Return to Terry Bisson's Author Page  




Dead Kennedy's Fresh Fruit For Rotting Vegetables in Culturie

By Russ Bestley
Culturie.Wordpress.com
August 26th, 2014

This is not a book about the Dead Kennedys career. It is more a tale of how they got together, recorded and released one of the iconic punk rock albums. The story of such a now fractured band requires a lot more discussion

Fresh fruit was different to so many other records at the time as there was no major record label providing financial supports. This was a band that were taking the shock aspect of punk and putting a positive message forward. The book charts the formation of the band as their early singles were released. The first two being “California über alles” and “Holiday in Cambodia”, both having raging guitar hooks, intelligent lyrics and breakneck rhythm. The story behind the controversy of the artwork and Biafra’s onstage antics is given great detail. How the album came about and the involvement of cherry red and subsequent setting up of alternative tentacles is included. All necessary components to the make up of the dks

Most of us now that the band did not finish on a good note or certainly the trajectory since their finish has not been a mutually happy event for the members. However it is good to see that not getting too much exposure here as that can be the sequel. For now we can read about one of the greatest albums of all time by one of the most innovative bands ever. We can get an idea of America at the time, the punk scene and the socio economic environment.

It is quite obvious, reading between the lines, that vocalist Jelllo Biafra, has a completely different outlook then guitarist east bay ray on pretty much all matters Dead Kennedys relating. It is hard to see what tale is fiction and what one isn’t but the fact is the record came out with those songs and we have been able to listen to them for years. The dead Kennedys had such a huge influence on music and this is summed up by the many quotes at the end from people like actor Elijah wood or slash from guns and roses or dave grohl from foo fighter/nirvana. The effect this album has had is phenomenal and is most worthy of the written word too

Another thing the book offers is a reminder of how great the artwork of Winston Smith is. It is reproduced here as are many of the fliers and posters of the day. Considering the author was involved in the art of punk book that came out over a year ago it is no surprise now has teamed up with once again with russ bestley to ensure that the words are accompanied with the relevant graphics and it’s all packaged very well

If you have ever listened to a punk roots and enjoyed it ten you should have a read of this

Buy this book now | Download e-Book now | Back to Alex Ogg's Author Page | Back to Winston Smith's Illustrator Page | Back to Ruby Ray's Artist Page




Dead Kennedy's Fresh Fruit For Rotting Vegetables in The Register

By Mark Diston
The Register.UK
August 24th, 2014

Alex Ogg is the editor of the academic journal Punk and Post-Punk and definitely has his work cut out mediating the last of the great punk rock feuds since Malcolm McLaren went to visit the Great Situationist in The Sky.

For over two decades, Jello Biafra – the lead singer of Dead Kennedys – has been at daggers drawn with his former bandmates East Bay Ray and Klaus Fluoride, and their spat shows no sign of abating.

It seems that they are unable to agree on anything. Even their memories diverge on just about every key issue. It is to Ogg’s credit that he has been able to construct such a fascinating and even-handed biography of the early days of the band, though it seems his patience has been sorely tried. The last line in the book reads, alluding to the remainder of the story: “Some other poor bastard can tackle that”.

Dead Kennedys: Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables, The Early Years performing

The spirit of the age: Dead Kennedys live

The book benefits from the collaboration of Winston Smith, who was responsible for most of the Dead Kennedys' artwork and which is spread liberally throughout the book, along with Ruby Ray’s captivating photos of the early San Francisco punk scene.

Alex Ogg’s book is likely to appeal not just to misty-eyed old punks but also to young musicians who will find many words of inspiration within, such as this description of the nascent SF scene: “The pressure was not on every band to sound the same and please the audience”. A better blueprint for musical creativity is hard to find.

Dead Kennedys: Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables, The Early Years - Let Them Eat Jellybeans compilation cover

Early underground music compilation album released on Jello Biafra's Alternative Tentacles label

There are some unexpected collaborations revealed, such as how old beats Ferlinghetti and Ginsberg financed the SF punk fanzine Search and Destroy, and a great anecdote about the Dead Kennedys supporting Sun Ra, who reputedly enjoyed them. However their respective audiences were less enamoured of each other.

Dead Kennedys: Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables, The Early Years flyer

1839 Geary Street Flyer – click for a larger image

Alex Ogg has really gone the extra mile in his research and the result is a labour of love. We get insights from teenage punks who hitch-hiked after the band during their first UK tour and reminiscences from support acts.

There’s the occasional celebrity namedrop too, such as Bob Mould of Husker Du introducing Biafra to Lydon (aka. Johnny Rotten from the Sex Pistols), before making a quick exit “because I’d never get a word in edgeways!”

This book encapsulates perfectly the time when punk was a movement and not an scholastic subject. Moreover, it reminded me of how relatively late on the scene the Dead Kennedys were, especially in the context of other bands emerging the UK at the same time.

Their first UK single, California Über Alles, came out after the debuts of Gang Of Four and The Human League. Biafra claims to have listened to Joy Division’s Closer (released June 1980) while designing the artwork for the band’s debut albumFresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables.

Dead Kennedys: Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables, The Early Years - California Uber Alles cover

California Über Alles satirised state governor Jerry Brown

The last section of the book consists of quotes from a pantheon of latter-day musicians attesting to the lasting influence of the wit and provocation of the Dead Kennedys. I can certainly concur with the latter, having narrowly escaped a serious battering in the 1980s for wearing a homemade I Kill Children badge, a song title from the first album.

Dead Kennedys: Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables, The Early Years_fallout

Advertisement from the pages of Winston Smith's Fallout magazine

Dead Kennedys is a riveting read, concise without being academic. It captures the era and the spirit of the times perfectly. Alex Ogg maintains a stoic patience until the appendix, where he shows a slight bias in favour of Ray and Klaus’ claims for writing credits on the album. I’m sure Jello’s lawyers will be in touch shortly after publication.

Dead Kennedys: Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables, The Early Years book coverAuthor Alex Ogg
Title Dead Kennedys: Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables,
The Early Years
Publisher PM Press
Price £12.99 (Paperback)
More info Publication web site

Buy this book now | Download e-Book now | Back to Alex Ogg's Author Page | Back to Winston Smith's Illustrator Page | Back to Ruby Ray's Artist Page




Making a graphic statement

Making a graphic statement
By Jayanthi Madhukar
Bangalore Mirror
August 25th, 2014

As a multimedia comic book artist, Seth Tobocman speaks out against injustice through his works

The bespectacled Seth Tobocman, with his hair tied back into a neat ponytail, can hold his audience spellbound with a dramatic narration of a story. This kind of narration is usually accompanied by live music. On a screen behind him, appear mostly black and white cartoon panels that he has drawn. It is those visuals and the stories accompanying them that make people sit up and listen. Tobocman calls this kind of audience interaction Cartoon Concert, a form he attributes to Vaughn Bode, an American cartoonist in the 1970s. "Bode would project his panels and perform the text," says Tobocman. "I chose those pieces that work well with a dramatic reading and sometimes also employ musicians to give atmosphere."

Speaking Through Comics

Tobocman's love for comics started young. As he says, he could draw before he could read. From a school-going boy who loved Marvel superheroes to a young adult's angst against injustice in society, today, Tobocman considers himself to be a neo-expressionist comic book artist. He has gone through the proverbial struggle, often feeling that "at any minute the ground would open up and swallow me" and has worked as an usher, a messenger and construction worker before finding work as an illustrator for New York Times and other newspapers.

In 1980, along with friend Peter Kuper, Tobocman started World War 3 Illustrated as a response to the Iran hostage crisis. "We were angry about Reagan and the rise of the right (wing). About gentrification. We felt someone had to say no!" he says of the times when no one was publishing serious comic art in the US. Theirs was the only comic book in those days to be sold in record stores as no book stores were interested in alternative comics.

The Inside Story

The stories Tobocman tells are often contained within one panel. Sometimes, within a book. But these stories are real, issues that people face, and very often from his own understanding of ground reality. As an artist and editor of the comic book World War 3 Illustrated, he says that what he really wants to do is to shake people out of their complacency. People, according to him, are way too passive. "They let too much stuff go. They know what is going on is wrong but they don't do anything about it. I also want to give some support and solidarity to those who are engaged in actions."

And that is why during the mid-80s and late '90s, he was part of the squatter movement of New York. Much before he moved with them on the suggestion of the squatters themselves, activists from New York to the African National Congress in South Africa had started using his pieces for leaflets and posters. Tobocman, along with the other squatters, seized about 30 buildings in Lower Manhattan. Thirteen of them were legalised in 2000, and the people squatting there became the owners. Along the way, people had to fix those buildings and defend them from police. He slept under leaky roofs, cleared rubble, lived without heat or hot water. One of the squats, Umbrella House, which he helped save from demolition crew and renovate, where he ran a printing press from its first floor, still remains, inhabited by many people.

Two things stand out. One, Tobocman was personally not in need of a home, since he had already rented an apartment. "I chose to work with the squatter movement because I felt they were addressing the most pressing problem of my community: lack of affordable housing." He was arrested about 20 times and convicted twice. Only an internal disagreement led him to give up the membership and leave the squat.

And that brings the second point to fore. Unlike most squatters, he compiled his experiences in the book War In the Neighbourhood (2000).

A Fighting Oeuvre

Tobocman has several books to his credit, each and every subject picked, being relevant to the people. Understanding The Crash illustrates how Wall Street created an economic whirlpool, while Disaster and Resistance described the first decade of the 21st century including 9/11, George Bush, the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Palestine and hurricane Katrina. Three Cities Against the Wall unites artists in Tel Aviv, Ramallah and New York in protest against the Israeli government's building of the wall through the occupied territories. Portraits of Israelis and Palestinians came out of a sketchbook Tobocman carried with him on his travels through the occupied territories in 2002 which saw him teaching art and English to kids in a Palestinian village.

At the time of this interview, he is outraged over the killing of Michael Brown by a policeman on a street in Ferguson, Missouri. "This happens all the f**king time!" he fumes. "American cops just can't seem to stop killing black people. It makes me very angry that there is so little progress on this issue. At least there is more awareness. When I was a kid, I think there were a lot of white middle class Americans who did not believe this was going on. Now, with all the videos and media, there is no excuse for being ignorant." And for that matter, no excuse, he says, for a citizen anywhere in the world to be passive. The best government, the best politicians and laws and Constitution, isn't worth anything if people don't speak up. Taking action on anything, be it art, politics or just paying attention to loved ones, he points out, is a great alternative to depression and despair. "Every day I gotta shake myself, break free of my demons and go for it."

Seth Tobocman was in the city recently for a Comic Conce

Buy World War 3 Illustrated now | Buy World War 3 Illustrated e-Book now | Back to Seth Toboman's Author Page



Jeremy Brecher's Strike! in Booklist

By Diego Báez
Booklist
August 14th, 2014

Brecher’s riveting primer on modern American labor history catalogs U.S. workers’ movements from the railroad strikes and Great Upheaval of July 1877 to the mass demonstrations and Haymarket affair of 1886 to Great Depression protests and Vietnam-era revolt to Time’s declaration of “The Protester” as person of the year in 2011. Brecher dives inside the everyday struggles of rank-and-file workers and provides a thoroughly researched, alternative history rarely mentioned in textbooks or popular media. Each chapter contextualizes the wide array of tactics workers have employed to negotiate fair wages and humane working conditions since the nineteenth century, such as collective bargaining, organized protest, nonviolent resistance, and armed conflict. This edition (the first was published in 1972) includes additional chapters on the Battle of Seattle, which disrupted the 1999 meeting of the World Trade Organization, and Occupy Wall Street, which inspired demonstrations across the country. Not surprisingly, Brecher’s text has been updated and reissued numerous times because of its compelling narrative style and exhaustive documentation. An important compendium, to be read alongside the books of Howard Zinn, Naomi Klein, and Noam Chomsky.

Buy Strike! now | Buy Strike! e-Book now | Back to Jeremy Brecher's Author Page



Search

Quick Access to:

Authors

Artists

New Releases

Featured Releases


Stealing All Transmissions: A Secret History of The Clash

A Line in the Tar Sands: Struggles for Environmental Justice