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Ian Glasper

 

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A veteran himself of the UK punk scene (having played bass for Decadence Within, Burnside, Flux Of Pink Indians, Stampin' Ground, Suicide Watch, Betrayed By Many, Freebase and, in the present day, Thirty Six Strategies), Ian Glasper's trilogy (plus one) of books about the UK's turbulent Eighties (and Nineties!) punk and hardcore scenes are widely regarded as the definitive accounts of those periods. A proud father of two, who cut his journalistic teeth with the popular Record Collector and Terrorizer magazines, not to mention various underground fanzines, he digs vegetarian food, Brazilian jiu-jitsu and gratuitously violent films, and is currently summoning up the courage to start a fifth book.

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The Day the Country Died: A History of Anarcho Punk 1980–1984
Author: Ian Glasper
Publisher: PM Press
ISBN: 978-1-60486-516-5
Published: 06/14
Format: Paperback
Size: 9 x 6
Page Count: 480
Subjects: Music-Punk/Politics-Anarchism

$24.95

The Day the Country Died features author, historian, and musician Ian Glasper (Burning Britain) exploring in minute detail the influential, esoteric, UK anarcho punk scene of the early Eighties.

If the colorful ’80s punk bands captured in Burning Britain were loud, political, and uncompromising, those examined in The Day the Country Died were even more so, totally prepared to risk their liberty to communicate the ideals they believed in so passionately.

With Crass and Poison Girls opening the floodgates, the arrival of bands such as Zounds, Flux of Pink Indians, Conflict, Subhumans, Chumbawamba, Amebix, Rudimentary Peni, Antisect, Omega Tribe, and Icons of Filth heralded a brand new age of honesty and integrity in underground music. With a backdrop of Thatcher’s Britain, punk music became self-sufficient and considerably more aggressive, blending a DIY ethos with activism to create the perfectly bleak soundtrack to the zeitgeist of a discontented British youth.

It was a time when punk stopped being merely a radical fashion statement, and became a force for real social change; a genuine revolutionary movement, driven by some of the most challenging noises ever committed to tape. Anarchy, as regards punk rock, no longer meant “cash from chaos.“ It meant “freedom, peace, and unity.“ Anarcho punk took the rebellion inherent in punk from the beginning to a whole new level of personal awareness.

All the scene’s biggest names, and most of the smaller ones, are comprehensively covered with new, exclusive interviews and hundreds of previously unseen photographs.

Praise:

“The oral testimony assembled here provides an often-lucid participant’s view of the work of the wider anarcho-punk milieu, which demonstrates just as tellingly the diversity as well as the commonality by which it was defined. The collection hints at the extent to which—within a militant antiwar, anti-work, anti-system framework—the perception and priorities of the movement’s activists differed: something the movement’s critics (who were always keen to deride the uniformity of the ’Crass punks’) rarely understood.“
—Rich Cross, Freedom

“With a backdrop of Thatcher’s Britain, punk music became self-sufficient and considerably more aggressive, blending a DIY ethos with activism to create the perfectly bleak soundtrack to the zeitgeist of a discontented British youth. Including such iconic bands as Crass, Conflict, Flux of Pink Indians, Subhumans, Chumbawamba, Oi Polloi, Amebix, Rubella Ballet and Zounds to name but a few, Ian Glasper’s history of punk stands out as an important and relevant history of the genre.“
—Dave Faulds, Dulwich Books Review

“Glasper is thorough and democratic. He lets everyone speak, tell their own story, edits out the rambling and bullshit and presents a fair picture of all the main bands from all over the UK and Ireland. Geographically divided up. It’s an encyclopaedic but down-to-earth reference book, full of detail and anecdotes.“
—Ged Babey, LouderThanWar.com

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Burning Britain: The History of UK Punk 1980–1984
Author: Ian Glasper
Publisher: PM Press
ISBN: 978-1-60486-748-0
Published: 06/14
Format: Paperback
Size: 9 x 6
Page Count: 416
Subjects: Music-Punk/History-UK

$24.95

As the Seventies drew to a close and the media declared punk dead and buried, a whole new breed of band was emerging from the gutter. Harder and faster than their ’76–’77 predecessors, not to mention more aggressive and political, the likes of Discharge, the Exploited, and G.B.H. were to prove not only more relevant but arguably just as influential.

Several years in the making and featuring hundreds of new interviews and photographs, Burning Britain is the true story of the UK punk scene from 1980 to 1984 told for the first time by the bands and record labels that created it. Covering the country region by region, author Ian Glasper profiles legendary bands like Vice Squad, Angelic Upstarts, Blitz, Anti-Nowhere League, Cockney Rejects, and the UK Subs as well as the more obscure groups like Xtract, The Skroteez, and Soldier Dolls.

The grim reality of being a teenage punk rocker in Thatcher’s Britain resulted in some of the most primal and potent music ever committed to plastic. Burning Britain is the definitive overview of that previously overlooked era.

Praise:

“Ian Glasper’s chatty, engaging history follows the regional lines along which UK punk’s ’second wave’ scene divided, as well as talking about the record labels involved and what the main protagonists, from the Anti-Nowhere League to Vice Squad, are up to now.“
—Iain Aitch, Guardian

“Glasper is thorough and democratic. He lets everyone speak, tell their own story, edits out the rambling and bullshit, and presents a fair picture of all the main bands from all over the UK and Ireland. Geographically divided up. It’s an encyclopaedic but down-to-earth reference book, full of detail and anecdotes.“
—Ged Babey, LouderThanWar.com

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  • Why the hell did I ever get into punk rock?
    Why the hell did I ever get into punk rock?   The two most common questions I get asked in conjunction with my books are: why write them in the first place? And, what got you into punk rock? Or when/why/how did you get into punk rock? You k...

What Others Are Saying...

 

dayThe Day the Country Died: A Review
By Jake Slovis
H-Net: Humanities and Social Science Reviews
January 2017

"Glasper concludes by dubbing anarcho punk “the most real and challenging incarnation of punk rock ever seen or heard.” That anarcho punk was something to be “seen” as well as “heard” does much to underscore that the movement was more than a sound; it was an experience and feeling. It is for this reason that nostalgia is often frowned upon, as so much of the movement was contingent on “doing.” Glasper also emphasizes that while the feelings that motivated anarcho punks were “stimulated” by the time, the spirit of the movement “remains an indomitable constant as long as there is injustice in the world” (p. 456). This “spirit” is perhaps best clarified by Scott Paton, guitarist of AOA: “‘We decided to vent our anger through music, and take a more direct approach with our protest, and for the most part it had the desired effect: an all out attack on what we wanted to change. And now here we are again; the relentless cycle of life and death continues unabated. There will always be something to be angry about ... and always a corresponding need for change’” (p. 455). While anarcho punk has faded, AOA’s message functions as a rally cry for future activists. It is founded on the hope that there is always an opportunity for change and suggests that anarcho punk’s ethical foundation will continue to endure within the social justice movements of tomorrow..."

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bbBurning Britain: A review
By John B. Moore
Neufutur.com
September 2014

If you quickly answer “Blink 182!” when asked about your favorite punk band, this book is probably not meant for you. But for those with a burning desire to dig deeper than The Clash and Sex Pistols to discover below-the-radar groups from the original British punk rock scene, then Burning Britain is your new Bible.

This dense, but still easily digestible reference (thanks to the brief write ups for each band. including essential discography, “at a glance” sections) includes plenty of influential bands you’ve likely heard of like Cockney Rejects, G.B.H., Discharge and The Adicts and many, many more you likely haven’t.

Burning Britain, written by Ian Glaser, a longtime punk rock fan (one of the reasons this book is enjoyable to read), originally came out 10 years ago, but this updated version includes seven new band entries as well as updated sections on English Dogs, Chaos UK and The Destructors. Certainly not for everyone, but the Holy Grail for some.

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bbGlasper's Burning Britain for the fans only
Rock Star Journalist
August 2014

"Connected to Glasper’s tendency to be either hyperbolic or minimalist — describing bands in basic one or two sentence summaries of the bands’ sounds — the fatal flaw in Burning Britain is an absolute need for the reader to be familiar with the acts in question. If you don’t know much past their singles, you’ll be lost, hoplessly adrift in a sea of anecdotes...."

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dayThe Day the Country Died: A Review
By Roger Batty
Musique Machine
August 2014

"The Anarcho-Punk scene was one of the most pro-active, prolific, and controversial musical happenings of the early 1980’s britain. It focused Punk rocks original sound into an often more stark & aggressive form, and it also saw bands advocating direct action, concerned about animal rights  issues, environmentalism, and anti war/ anti- nuclear weapon propaganda.  The scenes golden period lasted between 1980 and 1984, and this is the period that “The Day The Country” covers.

This is a new/second edition of Ian Glasper truly definitive study on the scene & the time, and it appears on Oakland based independent/ anarchist publisher PM Press. The book first came out on Cherry Red Press back in 2012- so it’s very telling of the keen interest in this scene & it’s key bands, that the book gets a re-print just two years after it original appeared..." 

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