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Gordon Carr

 

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Gordon Carr, now retired, has been a newspaper and television journalist working for BBC Television News making investigative documentaries. Carr also directed and produced The Angry Brigade film documentary released by PM Press.

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The Angry Brigade: A History of Britain's First Urban Guerilla Group
By Gordon Carr (with prefaces by John Barker and Stuart Christie)
Published: April 2010
ISBN: 978-1-60486-049-8
Format: Paperback
Page Count: 280
Dimensions: 9 by 6
Subjects: History, Political Science

$24.95

“You can't reform profit capitalism and inhumanity. Just kick it till it breaks.”
— Angry Brigade, communiqué.

Between 1970 and 1972, the Angry Brigade used guns and bombs in a series of symbolic attacks against property. A series of communiqués accompanied the actions, explaining the choice of targets and the Angry Brigade philosophy: autonomous organization and attacks on property alongside other forms of militant working class action. Targets included the embassies of repressive regimes, police stations and army barracks, boutiques and factories, government departments and the homes of Cabinet ministers, the Attorney General and the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police. These attacks on the homes of senior political figures increased the pressure for results and brought an avalanche of police raids. From the start the police were faced with the difficulty of getting to grips with a section of society they found totally alien. And were they facing an organization—or an idea?

This book covers the roots of the Angry Brigade in the revolutionary ferment of the 1960s, and follows their campaign and the police investigation to its culmination in the “Stoke Newington 8” conspiracy trial at the Old Bailey—the longest criminal trial in British legal history. Written after extensive research—among both the libertarian opposition and the police—it remains the essential study of Britain's first urban guerilla group.

This expanded edition contains a comprehensive chronology of the "Angry Decade," extra illustrations and a police view of the Angry Brigade. Introductions by Stuart Christie and John Barker (two of the "Stoke Newington 8" defendants) discuss the Angry Brigade in the political and social context of its times—and its longer-term significance.

Praise:

“Even after all this time, Carr's book remains the best introduction to the culture and movement that gave birth to The Angry Brigade. Until all the participant's documents and voices are gathered in one place, this will remain THE gripping, readable and reliable account of those days. It is essential reading and PM Press are to be congratulated for making it available to us.” --Barry Pateman, Associate Editor, The Emma Goldman Papers, University of California at Berkeley

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The Angry Brigade: The Spectacular Rise and Fall of Britain's First Urban Guerilla Group
Published: November 2008
UPC: 760137482093
Format:  DVD (NTSC)
Length: 60 Minutes
Package: 7.5 by 5.5
Languages: English
Subjects: Documentary, Anarchism, Armed Struggle

$19.95

Between 1970 and 1972 the Angry Brigade used guns and bombs in a series of symbolic attacks against property. A series of communiqués accompanied the actions, explaining the choice of targets and the Angry Brigade philosophy: autonomous organization and attacks on property alongside other forms of militant working class action. Targets included the embassies of repressive regimes, police stations and army barracks, boutiques and factories, government departments and the homes of Cabinet ministers, the Attorney General and the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police. These attacks on the homes of senior political figures increased the pressure for results and brought an avalanche of police raids. From the start the police were faced with the difficulty of getting to grips with a section of society they found totally alien. And were they facing an organization—or an idea?

This documentary, produced by Gordon Carr for the BBC (and first shown in January 1973, shortly after the trial), covers the roots of the Angry Brigade in the revolutionary ferment of the 1960s, and follows their campaign and the police investigation to its culmination in the “Stoke Newington 8” conspiracy trial at the Old Bailey—the longest criminal trial in British legal history. Produced after extensive research—among both the libertarian opposition and the police—it remains the essential study of Britain's first urban guerilla group.

Extra: The Persons Unknown (1980, 22 minutes)
The so-called “Persons Unknown” case in which members of the Anarchist Black Cross were tried (and later acquitted) at the Old Bailey on charges of “conspiring with persons unknown, at places unknown, to cause explosions and to overthrow society.” Featuring interviews and footage of Stuart Christie, Nicholas Walter, Crass and many other UK anarchist activists and propagandists of the time.

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Reviews

The Angry Brigade: A Review
by Joshua Sinai
Perspectives on Terrorism
Volume 12, Issue 2
April 2018

This is a highly informed and well-written account of the roots of the Angry Brigade, England’s militant le - wing group that originated in the mid-1960s and carried out a series of bombing attacks from 1970 to 1972. ese bombings were directed against iconic targets such as banks, embassies, and the homes of Conservative Members of Parliament, including the home of Robert Carr, the Secretary of State for Employment at the time. e author, a veteran BBC documentary producer, had produced a documentary about the Angry Brigade for the BBC in 1973, with this book being a journalistic expansion and update of the documentary.

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The Spectacular Rise and Fall of Britain's First Urban Guerilla Group
By Sarat Colling
Political Media Review

This BBC film by Gordon Carr, released in 1973 and republished in 2008, documents the events surrounding Britain’s longest ever conspiracy trial, in which eight young anarchists were charged with conspiring to commit 25 bomb attacks as members of the Angry Brigade.

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The Urban Guerrillas Britain Forgot
By Jonathon Green
The New Statesman
27 August, 2001

In the late Sixties and early Seventies, the Angry Brigade enraged the establishment. Jonathon Green on the questions that remain unanswered 30 years on

"The Angry Brigade is the man or woman sitting next to you. They have guns in their pockets and hatred in their minds. We are getting closer. Off the system and its property. Power to the People. Communique 9. The Angry Brigade"
(22 May 1971, following the bombing of Tintagel House)

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Et cetera: Steven Poole's non-fiction choice
by Steven Poole
The Guardian
September 18th, 2010

This fascinating history of "Britain's first urban guerrilla group" (who fought for the people while stealing their chequebooks) begins with the 1971 bombing of the house of the employment minister, Robert Carr, and then works back to the évènements of May 1968, and forwards through the complex police investigation by the newly formed "Bomb Squad", and then the lengthy and sensational 1972 trial of the "Stoke Newington 8", in whose flat had been found explosives, guns and the equipment used to issue the brigade's sub-Debordian public statements. Gordon Carr's narrative is scrupulous and suspenseful.

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