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Mandy Carter


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Mandy Carter began her long career as a human rights and nonviolent activist working with the War Resister's League (WRL) in San Francisco, beginning in 1969. A veteran of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s 1968 Poor People Campaign, Carter has been called “one of the nation’s leading African American lesbian activists” by the National Organization of Women. She has served on countless planning committees for national and regional lesbian and gay pride marches—including the steering committee for the historic 1987 March on Washington for Lesbians and Gays. As a staff member of the WRL’s Southeast regional office from 1982 to 1988, Carter worked on the Boards of the National Stonewall Democratic Federation, the Triangle Foundation, Equal Partners in Faith, and Ladyslipper Music.



In 1990, Ms. Carter was campaign manager for North Carolina Senate Vote ’90, an electoral campaign organizing against long-time U.S. Senator Jesse Helm. In 1992, Carter joined the staff of the Human Rights Campaign in Washington DC, serving as Public Policy Advocate with a particular focus on the religious and radical right's attacks on gays and lesbians through exploitation of the black community. She also has served as the national field director and board member of the former National Black Lesbian and Gay Leadership Forum. Carter is a co-founder of Southerners On New Ground (SONG). In 2010, the National Black Justice Coalition featured Mandy in their “Jewel” column, noting that she is “a legend in the LGBT community, the Black community, and to all of us concerned about peace.”

Check out Mandy Carter & Matt Meyer speaking on RT TV, January 20th, 2013:


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We Have Not Been Moved: Resisting Racism and Militarism in 21st Century America
Editors: Elizabeth Betita Martínez, Mandy Carter & Matt Meyer with an Introduction by Cornel West and Afterwords/poems by Alice Walker & Sonia Sanchez
Publisher: PM Press
ISBN: 978-1-60486-480-9
Published July 2012
Format: Paperback
Size: 9 by 6
Page count: 576 Pages
Subjects: Politic/History
$29.95


We Have Not Been Moved is a compendium addressing the two leading pillars of U.S. Empire. Inspired by the work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who called for a “true revolution of values” against the racism, militarism, and materialism which he saw as the heart of a society “approaching spiritual death,” this book recognizes that—for the most part—the traditional peace movement has not been moved far beyond the half-century old call for a deepening critique of its own prejudices. While reviewing the major points of intersection between white supremacy and the war machine through both historic and contemporary articles from a diverse range of scholars and activists, the editors emphasize what needs to be done now to move forward for lasting social change. Produced in collaboration with the War Resisters League, the book also examines the strategic and tactic possibilities of radical transformation through revolutionary nonviolence.

Amongst the historic texts included are rarely-seen writings by anti-racist icons such as Anne Braden, Barbara Deming, and Audre Lorde, as well as a dialogue between Dr. King, revolutionary nationalist Robert F. Williams, Dave Dellinger, and Dorothy Day. Never-before-published pieces appear from civil rights and gay rights organizer Bayard Rustin and from celebrated U.S. pacifist supporter of Puerto Rican sovereignty Ruth Reynolds. Additional articles making their debut in this collection include new essays by and interviews with Fred Ho, Jose Lopez, Joel Kovel, Francesca Fiorentini and Clare Bayard, David McReynolds, Greg Payton, Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons, Ellen Barfield, Jon Cohen, Suzanne Ross, Sachio Ko-Yin, Edward Hasbrouck, Dean Johnson, and Dan Berger. Other contributions include work by Andrea Dworkin, Mumia Abu-Jamal, Starhawk, Andrea Smith, John Stoltenberg, Vincent Harding, Liz McAlister, Victor Lewis, Matthew Lyons, Tim Wise, Dorothy Cotton, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Kenyon Farrow, Frida Berrigan, David Gilbert, Chris Crass, and many others. Peppered throughout the anthology are original and new poems by Chrystos, Dylcia Pagan, Malkia M’Buzi Moore, Sarah Husein, Mary Jane Sullivan, Liz Roberts, and the late Marilyn Buck.

Praise:

“When we sang out ‘We Shall Not Be Moved’ in Montgomery and Selma, we were committed to our unshakeable unity against segregation and violence. This important book continues in that struggle—suggesting ways in which we need to do better, and actions we must take against war and continued racism today. If the human race is still here in 2111, the War Resisters League will be one of the reasons why!”
—Pete Seeger, folk singer and activist

“The rich and still evolving tradition of revolutionary pacifism, effectively sampled in these thoughtful and penetrating essays, offers the best hope we have for overcoming threats that are imminent and grim, and for moving on to create a society that is more just and free. These outstanding contributions should be carefully pondered, and taken to heart as a call for action.”
—Noam Chomsky, professor emeritus of linguistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; philosopher, cognitive scientist, and activist

“One of the biggest stumbling blocks to building a successful movement against war has been our inability to cross racial and cultural lines, bridging the divides created and maintained by the powers that be. Since the 1960s, there have been some hopeful signs—in grassroots groups and in educational efforts—but the road forward is still long and difficult. The contributors to We Have Not Been Moved, with extraordinary scope and vision, have given us an indispensable tool to fight oppression, resist war and injustice, and create powerful new coalitions for lasting social change. This volume should be required reading—alongside of Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States—in every sociology and political science class.” 
—Connie Hogarth, life-long peace and justice activist and inspiration for Manhattanville College’s Connie Hogarth Center for Social Action; co-founder and former executive director of the Westchester People’s Action Coalition


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What Others are Saying


We Have Not Been Moved: A Review
By Ian Sinclair
PeaceNews
February 2013

At 582 pages it's a daunting book. However, there is much of interest in the long-form essays, articles, interviews, photos, poems, manifestos and dialogues from both well-known and less well known activists. Barbara Deming's moving first-hand account of a mixed race peace walk in the Deep South in the early 1960s is a real pleasure to read, as is Dave Dellinger's thoughtful reflection on the class dynamics of anti-war groups. Another highlight is anarchist Chris Crass's very practical guide 'Tools For White Guys Who Are Working For Social Change'. As these contributions suggest the title doesn't fully do justice to the book's varied concerns - a significant number of contributors have a deep interest in revolutionary nonviolence.

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A Stronger Movement Against War
by Michael Fiorentino
WIN REVIEW

Fall 2012

Buy the book forces us to ask a deep question: How do we construct a viable antiwar movement in the United States that confronts the institutional racism right here at home? The section “Chicken and Eggs: War, Race, and Class” provides the reader with helpful historical context. In particular, Ruth Wilson Gilmore’s piece stands out as a lucid explanation of the connection between mass incarceration of people of color and militarism.


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