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Sober Living for the Revolution: The Song

In 2010, PM Press published the book Sober Living for the Revolution: Hardcore Punk, Straight Edge, and Radical Politics. Numerous artists and activists trying to relate sobriety to the struggle for a better world contributed to the volume.

Now, there is also a Sober Living for the Revolution song. It is one of 13 tracks on Crucible, the latest album by the “socio-political, straight edge band” Rebirth, hailing from Melbourne, Australia. The name of the song is no coincidence. It addresses the potential and positivity of Straight Edge as much as the pitfalls of doctrine and self-righteousness. This is why the band’s members considered “Sober Living for the Revolution” to be an apt title.

While often associated with metalcore, reminiscent of the “new school” straight edge wave of the early 1990s, Rebirth’s music is more varied and defies simple categorization. Released by Melbourne’s own life lair regret records, the band continues an often underrated tradition of great Australian hardcore acts. Keep yourself updated on their Facebook page, and listen to “Sober Living for the Revolution” on Bandcamp. “I reject your poisons and your dogma.”

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Gabriel Kuhn is most recently author of Playing as if the World Mattered: An Illustrated History of Activism in Sports. Check out his other titles including: Turning Money into Rebellion: The Unlikely Story of Denmark’s Revolutionary Bank Robbers, Life Under the Jolly Roger: Reflections on Golden Age Piracy, Sober Living For the Revolution: Hardcore Punk, Straight Edge, and Radical Politics, Soccer vs. the State: Tackling Football and Radical Politics,  and more HERE. Gabriel is also the translator and editor of Revolution and Other Writings: A Political Reader, a collection of Gustav Landauer's writings.   



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